Response to the Covid-19 Pandemic

We are once again seeing all patients, but at a limited capacity. Please bring a mask with you to your appointment if at all possible.

Memphis and Shelby County is continuing to phase into reopening during the Covid-19 outbreak. MECA is continuing to follow the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) protocol to best ensure the health and safety of our patients and employees:
• MECA physicians and staff wear masks at all times while in the clinic.
• Patients are asked to bring a mask and wear it while in the building.
• After checking in, patients are asked to wait in the car until it is time for testing or their exam.
• Family/guests are asked to remain outside unless the patient needs assistance.
• Everyone’s temperature is checked on entering the building. If anyone has a temperature, has been in a Covid infected area in the last 14 days, or has been in contact with anyone that has a confirmed diagnosis of coronavirus, they are asked to reschedule their appointment.
• If and when appropriate, the doctor may decide to schedule a telemedicine appointment.
• We are continuing to reschedule surgery for patients whose surgery was postponed earlier in the spring due to the quarantine.

Thank you for your loyalty and patience as we navigate our clinic reopening. As always, our physicians are on call 24 hours a day. If you have a need or concern, please call our office at 901-767-3937

MECA Physicians and Staff

Retinal disorders are conditions that affect the layer of tissue at the back of the eye, known as the retina. This important part of the eye responds to light and passes on images to the brain. All retinal disorders affect your vision in some way, but some can also lead to blindness.

Macular degeneration. Also known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this condition affects the center part of the retina, the macula. This area is needed for the sharp, central vision that is used during everyday activities such as driving, reading or working with tools. This condition is a leading cause of vision loss in people over the age of 60 years old. Treatment can slow the loss of vision, but it will not restore vision that has already been lost.

Diabetic eye disease. The high blood sugar (glucose) levels that occur with diabetes can also affect vision. One type of diabetic eye disease is diabetic retinopathy, which affects the blood vessels in the retina. This can lead to blurry or double vision, blank spots in the vision and pain in one or both eyes. Diabetics may also be at higher risk of developing other eye conditions, such as cataracts and glaucoma.

Retinal detachment. This medical emergency happens when the retina pulls or lifts off of its normal position. It can cause symptoms such as floaters in the field of vision, light flashes and the feeling of a “curtain” in the way of your vision. If not treated right away, a retinal detachment can lead to permanent blindness in that eye.

Retinoblastoma. This cancer of the retina is generally uncommon; although, it is the most common type of eye cancer in children. The cancer starts in the cells of the retina, but can spread to other parts of the body (metastasize).

Macular pucker. Scar tissue on the macula can make the central vision become blurry and distorted. Although the symptoms are similar, macular pucker is not the same as age-related macular degeneration. The symptoms of a macular pucker are usually mild and do not require treatment. Sometimes, the scar tissue can fall off the retina on its own, and the vision will return to normal.

Macular hole. This condition is caused by a small break in the macula, which leads to blurriness and distortion in the central vision. Related to aging, this condition usually happens in people over the age of 60. Some macular holes close up on their own while others require surgery to help improve vision.

Floaters. These are specks, or “cobwebs,” that appear in the field of vision. Unlike scratches on the cornea, which follow your eye movements, floaters can drift even when the eyes are not moving. Most people have some floaters and have no problem with their vision. A sudden increase in the number of floaters, though, can indicate a more serious eye problem such as retinal detachment.

If you notice a change in your vision or simply have not undergone a routine eye ex

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight

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  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy

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Our Location

Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed